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Spring 2020

Take 2020- Starting Fresh

Written by Jessica Shelburne The year 2020 has been met with a range of welcomes – from thoughts of war and global conflict to hope for the new beginning and opportunities alike. Some find joy in creating ambitious New Year’s resolutions, while others feel there is nothing special about another trip around the sun. Regardless, there is a noticeable difference in the atmosphere after midnight on New Year’s Eve. I feel strongly that time is a construct. Maybe it’s because I am an Aquarius, or perhaps because I am just very aware of life’s transitory nature. Minutes, hours, days, and weeks all are purely moments of existence that lie on a continuum which is not dictated by a clock or calendar. Humanity, with its perpetual need to be in control, has designed time for the purpose of creating order. The concept of time and the measurements thereof are not bad. In fact, the order it maintains is useful and good. Plus, it gives people a chance to decide when they would like to change their habits and start new routines. Why is it that we decide to start or stop doing something at the beginning or end of some kind of cycle? “Next month, next week, next year,” we declare as we plan to change but allow ourselves the remaining time to indulge in the same behavior. What if we took the initiative to change in the moment that we see a change is needed? After a cup of coffee, before your Friday evening walk, during class. If we implemented plans of improvement quickly, everyone could experience new and favorable beginnings far more frequently – not just at the beginning of the year. Any kind of goal that will positively effect life is worth striving for, and the sooner it…

Maroons Cook Up Hot Winter

Written by Alexis Barton The men’s basketball team was staying busy over winter break with lots of competition. After a quick 10-day break, the Maroons returned to campus to embark on a seven game win streak which was just recently snapped by nationally ranked ODAC rival Virginia Wesleyan. Despite their two losses, this team is here to show fans that they have no quit and are ready for more competition. To start off their late-December endeavors, the Maroons hosted two teams in the Cregger Invitational, Stevenson University and Stockton University. The Maroons went undefeated in the tournament, winning each game by at least five possessions. The team took their success on the road as they faced Eastern Mennonite at the beginning of the new year. In a close game, the Maroons came back in the second half to force an overtime period. The team’s depth and stamina once again led them to a conference win. The Maroons continued their success as they continued conference play at home. The team took on Emory & Henry and stung the Wasps with a huge second half with 51 points. The Maroons took that game in dramatic fashion with an 84-55 win led by freshman guard, Kasey Draper, who had a team-leading 20 points in the game. Next, the Maroons hosted conference rival Shenandoah. In what would be their sixth straight win, the Maroons dominated the court and kept the visiting Hornets at bay by holding a four-possession lead. The team took their hot streak on the road where once again they beat ODAC competitor Ferrum in a game of 80-67. The team has since lost their incredible win streak, but they are no weak opponent. Against Virginia Wesleyan and Washington & Lee, the Maroons have narrowly lost by single digits in each game….

The Case of the Crowded Gym

Written by Lucy Collins It’s that time of year again: the dreaded crowded gym of those attempting to complete their New Year, New Me resolutions. 2019 has come and gone and with 2020 in full swing, we are witnesses to those attempting to make resolutions. Of course, new year’s resolutions vary pertaining to the individual who makes them, but the most common resolution is that of a healthier lifestyle. When this idea pops into people’s heads, exercising is generally attributed to a healthier way of life and thus we see the influx of gym goers in the first few weeks of January. Now how does this affect those who stepped foot into the gym long before 2020 began?   According to Senior Madie Herring, who works the gym desk in the Cregger Center, “There is definitely an increase in the amount of people that go to the gym, making the busier hours busier.”  This means those of you have a specific treadmill you like to use, you may have to be wary of your own gym experience, at least until February. The more of a routine that individuals get into at the beginning of the new year can set the stage for a healthier lifestyle throughout the rest of the year. Although, the number of new gym goers can dwindle down after a short amount of time.  “In the past there has been a decrease in people after three weeks of making their resolution. Especially as they get into a routine with school, they don’t go to the gym as much. There are a few people I have seen who have stuck with it, but do not come in as frequently as they did at the start of the semester,” says Herring.  This is often normal for individuals who have made…

INQ Classes: Are They Really Worth It?

Written by Caisi Calandra My time at Roanoke College is coming to an end, and I’m finding that, during my last semester, I’m taking a seminar class and my INQ-300 at the same time. Pretty smart planning on my behalf, right? I actually needed to postpone one of my classes last semester — otherwise I wouldn’t have been a full-time student this semester. And so 300 it was. I’m glad I waited, though, because I got to take a 300 with one of my favorite professors, Dr. McGlaun. I’d never had her out of a creative writing class, so watching her teach students outside of a purely creative setting is interesting. The topic of our 300 is “civil discourse,” and, judging by the readings we’ve already been assigned, we’re gonna get into some pretty heavy topics. One of our most important ones at the moment is “empathy.” Even though we’ve thoroughly discussed its definition, and how it pertains to civil discourse, there’s always the question: do we need empathy to have civil discourse? And does civil discourse foster empathy? Most students agreed, but there was, of course, a black sheep or two that disagreed. Of course, this class has challenged us to think about the necessity of our INQ curriculum. At our professor’s behest, we’ve had to complete brief assignments concerning our own thoughts on what we in particular have learned from our INQ classes (and some classes pertaining to our majors). One of the most fulfilling INQ classes has actually been my May Term class, Differ-Abilities, with Prof. Bosch. It was the most enlightening INQ class I’ve ever taken, and I wish it was an INQ class that could last a whole semester. It’s a class that really forces students to experience disabilities for themselves — while creating and…

“Little Women” Making Big Waves

Written by Alexandra Gautier The latest of several movie adaptations of Louisa May Alcott’s dearly beloved novel, Little Women, has made an impression on viewers, both those familiar with and new to the story. With a star-studded cast including the likes of Meryl Streep, Emma Watson and Saoirse Ronan, high expectations for he film were met and exceeded.  The story centers around the March family, comprised of Marmee and her four daughters: Jo, Meg, Amy and Beth, during the Civil War period in Concord, Massachusetts. At a local ball, the witty and intelligent Jo meets her best friend and love interest, Laurie. The pair have many adventures together and with Jo’s sisters, such as putting on plays, ice skating, and writing stories. Despite the cheerful and merry demeanor of the latter half of the film, tragedy strikes in the former with the increasingly unstable condition of Beth’s health. Unlike the novel which unfolds in a linear manner, the film’s story line cuts back and forth several years, with older scenes taking on a golden, sun-kissed quality to them, and scenes seven years in their future having a darker, more somber tone. Not only does this help to distinguish between scenes in the story’s timeline, but it is reflective of the rosy retrospection upon which we remember moments of our past. The strong headed Jo, though living during the 1860s, remains a contemporary character whose struggles and triumphs resonate during a time where female empowerment is still very much necessary. Her existence is a statement that in order to be fulfilled, one must not look towards another person, but rather look inward and follow their passions. This film has quickly become a personal favorite, and I strongly urge anyone considering purchasing tickets to do so. Little Women is a testament to…

The Perug Diaries: Entry One

Written by Lauren Roth You know in the movie The Princess Diaries with Anne Hathaway when it’s the end of the movie and Joe tells Princess Mia to look out the window to see Genovia? That scene is exactly what it looked like when we started to land in Rome. I decided to go study abroad for a whole semester, never being out of the country before, and barley ever being off the east coast, but I did it anyway. And let me tell you, it’s been a rollercoaster. The first week we were in Perugia, Italy we had orientation. In less than 24 hours I met half the people in the program, and to this day I still can’t remember everyone’s names. They packed our days with activities, and when you weren’t going to school events, we would explore the city, all day and all night. I think I was getting 4 hours of sleep a night and walking 25,000 steps a day, it was like freshman orientation on steroids.  We’ve been in Italy for about a week and a half now but it’s like I’ve known these people for years. This past weekend some of the friends I have made here and I went to Lago Trasimeno (Lake Trasimeno) and Cortona, Italy. When the 5 of us arrived in Passignano to still the lake, the train pulled in to the most run-down station I had ever seen. There was not a person near us, not even someone to sell tickets, and there was a dense fog that covered the countryside we just found ourselves in. It seriously looked like we were in the beginnings of a horror film, but we said screw it and decided to have a great day. We made our way to a small coffee…

Maroons Officially Add Wrestling

Written by Garrett Ruggieri Roanoke College will join Ferrum, Shenandoah (2020) and Washington and Lee as the only teams that sport an official NCAA Division III wrestling program. This addition will kick start at the beginning of the fall semester of 2021. In the meantime, administration will look to add coaches and recruitment plans in efforts to gear up for the first season of Maroon wrestling. Congratulations!

Women’s Basketball Cruising

Written by Alexis Barton The women’s basketball team has been heating up in the cold winter weather. Since their season opened in mid-November, these Maroons have gone on to win eight out their 10 most recent games. These women are holding their own at fourth place in the highly competitive ODAC standings. The team recently lost their five-game win streak to conference rival Washington & Lee on Tuesday, but it seems as if nothing will stop this team from success. The Maroons have been unstoppable at home, with a record of 7-2 in Cregger this season. In their most recent home game against conference rival Ferrum, the Maroons came out on top after a close game with a big fourth quarter. The team was led by guards Renee Alquiza and Ayanna Scarborough who each had 11 points in the game. Alquiza also had 7 rebounds, adding to her season total of 81 rebounds in her 17 games. These two superstars are backed by incredible depth throughout the whole team. Within the team, guard Whitney Hopson was recently recognized by the conference as ODAC Player of the Week after contributing heavily in Roanoke’s win over Emory & Henry. In this game, the Maroons were able to hand the Wasps their first in-conference loss of the season. Guard Kristina Harrel was also recognized on the conference level for her field goal percentage, ranking third in all of ODAC with 51.7%. This group of women are exciting and thrilling to watch, and it’s always fun to watch a winning team. This deep roster is soaring to a stellar season. Within the next week, the Maroons will test two ODAC competitors on the road before returning to campus next Wednesday to take on rival Lynchburg. This Saturday, be sure to catch these Maroons as…

Golden Globers Gawk at Gesticulating Gervais’ Grandiloquence

Written by Joseph Carrick Before we delve into the spectacle that took over social by storm, let’s take a quick look at the Golden Globes itself. The Golden Globes honor film and American television shows and are hosted by the Hollywood Foreign Press. There is a long slew of awards given during the ceremony – including 15 motion picture awards and 12 Television awards. However, there are usually only a few key awards that gain traction in the presses: Best Drama Film, Best Musical/Comedy Film, Best Drama Series, Best Musical/Comedy Series, Best Miniseries/Television movie, and two unofficial yet important attributes: Most awarded and most nominated.  In the same order as listed above, the winners are 1917, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, Succession, Fleabag, Chernobyl, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (3 awards), and Marriage Story (6 nominations). This also marked the second year the “Carol Burnett Award” was awarded, and therefore it is technically the first year it was awarded to someone who was not Carol Burnett. Ellen DeGeneres won the award this year thanks to her many television shows as well as her philanthropic work.  Now for the part literally everyone reading this has been waiting for: the opening speech given by Ricky Gervais. Gervais is a British comedian known for his insults, black comedy, and as a frequent host of the Golden Globes. Seeing as this was his last year hosting the event, he apparently decided to end his tenure by calling out the entirety of Hollywood and Corporate America for being two-faced, moral-less know-nothings not worth the grandeur they bestow upon themselves in these lavish award ceremonies only they seem to care about. There seems to be no safe from his scathing tirade of an opening monologue. To give a succinct idea of how well-rounded his…

RC Hosts Fanchon Glover to Honor King’s Legacy

Written by Jessica Shelburne On Monday evening, a lecture was presented on campus to commemorate the 25-year anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Dr. Fanchon Glover, Chief Diversity Officer for the College of William and Mary, spoke on behalf of King’s activism legacy and the fight for equal rights, embodying the college’s week-long theme of “Pushing Back to Push Forward.”  Main points of Glover’s lecture included leading others in a selfless manner, exercising patience while awaiting change, and understanding that the fight for freedom is everyone’s responsibility. King personified these characteristics in his years of peaceful, persistent activism for equality and integration. He emphasized during his career that the mission would not be one of quick resolution; rather, it was a lengthy process that would require continuous involvement.  “I may not get there with you, but we as a people will get to the promised land,” King famously stated. Political polarization in the United States has been a problem since the nation’s establishment. Mass division between all kinds of affiliations makes it difficult to uphold America’s founding value of “equal justice under law.” Glover specifically highlighted this growing problem and urged audience members at the lecture that we must reach out to those who can help fulfill our mission and create an impact.  Striving for justice and accomplishing a goal are often arduous in completion, but Glover concluded her lecture with three critical elements that must be practiced when fighting for a cause: 1) Determine what the central issues are and what you want to achieve; 2) Build an alliance; 3) Create a vision and think realistically about how it will play out. Combining these components with preparation, determination, and consistency is reflective of King’s journey for equality and can be similarly employed today, as the fight for justice…